Author Topic: Do Nurses Eat Their Young?  (Read 2961 times)

Offline loveme

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Do Nurses Eat Their Young?
« on: May 30, 2016 @ 10:11 AM »
Hi,

Do Nurses Eat Their Young? When I was in nursing school I remember hearing students talk about nurses eating their young. To be honest I really did not think that much about it. After I graduated from nursing school, and passed the NCLEX, I went to work in L&D They were very busy and had been looking for a head nurse for over a year. My preceptorship was scheduled for 6 weeks, but another new nurse started ,so my preceptor started helping her after about three weeks training me.

I loved working there, but often felt the lack of leadership, which made me uncomfortable. As a new nurse, I was often ask by the charge nurse to do one thing and then 20 minutes later another. The first few months were difficult, but the joy you would see, on the mom and dad's face after a delivery, made it worth it all.

One day I had a patient that had a great delivery. After a patient delivers, the nurse checks the patient 4 times then takes the patient to the postpartum unit. After checking my patient the third time, I called the postpartum unit to make sure they were prepare for the patient. As, I hung up the phone Misty, one of the nurses, ask me to mix a bottle for her. She directed me toward a counter where she had a bottle of D5I/2 normal saline with a lot of vials of magnesium sulfate sitting around it. Misty also took more vials out of her lab coat. She ask me to put the vials in the bottle of D5I/2 normal saline and said she would be  right back to get it.

After completing the task, I sat all the empty vials around the bottle of D5I/2 normal saline. There were a total of 16 empty vials. I had never mixed a bottle with 16 vials of magnesium sulfate, the standard was 8 vials, but that was what Misty ask me to do so I did it.

Next, I checked my patient for the 4th time and then took her to postpartum. Once I signed off, with the nurse in postpartum, I went back to Labor and Delivery. When I came back the charge nurse, Sarah, held up a bottle and said Is this the bottle? I told her where I left the bottle and the fact that there were  16 empty vials sitting around the bottle of D5I/2 normal saline. In addition I told her I left the bottle on the  opposite counter. I ask Sarah  if she wanted me to take the bottle to the lab and have them analyzed it, so we would know what was in it.  Sarah said "no." Next I ask Sarah if I should ask all the nurses if they had recently hung a bottle;  again the answer was "no."

Since I had not been working in Labor and Delivery long, I was not sure exactly what would happen if another patient got the bottle  by accident. I ask  Misty and she put her arm around my shoulder and said "calcium gluconate will always reverse it." Then Sarah the charge nurse, told me to go to the admission room and start working the patient up. I did as she ask me to do, but in my mind I still had a feeling there was something that should have been done. Suddently Sarah walked in the admission room.  She ask me to go to room 7 and get the vital signs on that patient. I ask her one final question, which was "should we do an incident report?" Again the answer was "no."

I went to room 7 and as I started to get the patient's blood pressure there was an overhead message CODE BLUE Labor and Delivery. I flew out of the room and went into the room where the code was. We started CPR on the patient and within a few minutes the code team was there and took over.

I backed up against the wall and started to feel sick. Had she gotten the bottle?? As I was standing there I heard Tina, the patient's nurse, talking to Sarah. I could hear them talking and one of the things I saw Tina do was pull out a trifold napkin where she had written notes on the patient.

I did not know at the time, but found out later that someone had thrown the bottles away during the code, which is not suppose to be done. Because of this we never found out if the patient had received the bottle I mixed.

The head nurse called me on a Sunday afternoon and told me they thought the bottle I mixed killed the patient and I needed to be at the hospital at 8 am on Monday to talk with the hospital attorneys, the doctors and the nurses. The hospital attorney told us to say "It was an unfortunate sequence of event." That was all we were suppost to say.

It took over 2 years for the attorneys to prove there was conspiracy and fabrication of the records. They settled out of court for 3.3 million years. Unfortunatly, so many things happened during the 2 years. One of the most difficult things was I had gotten pregnant and the head nurse spoke with my doctor and told him the only way I could deliver their was if we had a "table top discussion." My physician knew what happened and he said he did not feel comfortable with me delivering there after the comment that the head nurse said. I ended up going to a rural hospital about 30 minutes away and there were complications. My daughter almost died with a 1-1 apgar.

Thank God she ended up being okay, but that was not the case for me. I was diagnosed 6 months after my daughter was born with severe anxiety and depression. Several years ago, when they changed the definition  of PTSD I took a test and my diagnosis was changed to PTSD.

Since the event, the nursing school I attended tells this story every year. I finally decided to put the story in writing for others to read and hopefully prevent someone else from doing what I done. I listened to nurses that had all been there over 5 years and did what I was ask to do. I wish I had gone with my gut feeling and tried to find out where the bottle ended up, but as I mentioned I was told no to every question I ask.

It has been 27 years and I still think about that day and how it was a day that changed my life forever. Having PTSD is very difficult, because there can be so many things that are triggers.

So, I found out the hard way that nurses do eat their young and I feel like the price I paid to find this out was my life. I hope my story will prevent this from happening to anyone else.So, if you have ever wondered if nurses eat their young, the answer is YES.

                                                                                                                QUESTION?
Has anyone else been a scapegoat? What was the outcome for you?




If you have anxiety disorder or depression how do you manage it? Has anyone tried magnetic therapy or any other type of therapy?



Offline Cassie_rae

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Re: Do Nurses Eat Their Young?
« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2016 @ 03:26 PM »
First off, this is an amazing post! Thank you for sharing your story.

Second, I am so sorry that you went through all of that. I was lucky enough that the nurses I work with have never been mean to me. I don't have words to describe what those nurses are because that is beyond mean.

I am glad that you have learned to listen to your gut. I have to say though, I understand why you didn't speak up. As a new nurse you don't always know the protocols and you don't have enough confidence to stand up to more experienced nurses.

It took me a while to learn speak up, but one day while I was still training I saw a strip that just didn't look very good. I kept telling the nurses that we really should check on the patient. The nurses kept saying that everything was fine, that it was just a stubborn baby, even though the baby was having late decels that lasted 60+ second into the 40s. After following my gut I checked on the patient and tried changing her position and such to stop the decels, and that not working, I call the doctor who decided we should do a crash c/s. The problem was that the baby had a double knotted cord and the cord around his neck. As he was descending the knots were getting tighter, cutting off the blood supply. Thankfully the baby was ok, but apgars were 2, 5, & 7.

I am glad to hear that your daughter is OK as well.

I hope you can find some healing and again, I am sorry that you were involved in the whole situation.

Offline loveme

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Re: Do Nurses Eat Their Young?
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2016 @ 02:05 PM »

Thanks for responding. I realized after sending it that it probably was not going to be the best for moms, but it always stays on my mind. I think that my kids have had to suffer too because I have been sick so long.

I did learn a lesson though and tend to always listen to my gut feeling about things. I will entertain someone's idea, but it does not feel right I go with my gut.

Thank you for sharing as well.

Take care!

Offline Cassie_rae

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Re: Do Nurses Eat Their Young?
« Reply #3 on: Jun 01, 2016 @ 04:25 AM »
I think it is great for moms. Even though at first it doesn't relate to being a mom, in general, having PTSD, anxiety, depression, or any other mental illness affects you as a mom and there is such a stigma around these illnesses that no one wants to talk about them. It is important to talk about them and I think your post is a great conversation starter.

 


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